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The following resources, developed by our National Mentoring Center project (1998-2012) can help school administrators and staff, as well as their community partners, design and implement effective mentoring services in K-12 school settings. The ABCs of School-Based Mentoring This revised version
Starting college can be stressful for all students but in particular for those who have experienced trauma. How can educators help?
Providing students with structure and boundaries doesn't have to take a big effort and can help young people learn more effectively.
What does Education Northwest do? Our newly refreshed website makes it easier to find out.
This fall, the Institute for Youth Success at Education Northwest is excited to launch Empowered Hour: Conversations on Youth Success (and Drinks!).
IYS Night at the Movies is a celebration—a time to recognize the work of the afterschool, mentoring, and youth-development staff in our community. Your dedication is transforming Oregon, one student at a time.
Incorporating youth voice into academic settings requires educators and other adults to be mindful and think critically about when they need to step up (and step out) to best support youth.
This document was created as an easy-to-read, research-based primer for people just beginning to think in new ways about social-emotional learning.
      Do you know what it takes to build an emotionally and physically safe space for youth? Building an emotionally safe community of peers and adults is essential for youth to learn and develop as individuals. This interactive workshop will introduce participants to a variety of activities
      The Research Institute (TRI), in partnership with the Oregon Department of Education (ODE), is hosting the 21st Century Community Learning Centers (CCLC) 2016 Spring Conference at Western Oregon University on May 5 and 6. The conference theme is "Every Student Thriving, and the
What is social and emotional learning (SEL)? What about nonacademic skills; workplace-essential skills; 21st-century skills; and mindsets, essential skills and habits (MESH)?
Empowering Volunteers and Increasing Impact: Lessons from SMART’s Refreshed Volunteer Training Program
      Join the Institute for Youth Success at Education Northwest for a series of professional development opportunities designed for youth program staff. Intro to Active Participatory Approach—Free! July 19 (Portland, Ore., location TBA, 9:30 a.m.-12 p.m.) How do young people learn? Is your
Belonging is a fundamental human need. What strategies that educators can use to help students feel more secure in their school experiences?
Jacob Williams looks at the role educators can play in supporting youth to help keep them out of trouble and discusses several risk domains associated with young people based on a new, comprehensive literature review.
      Join the The Institute for Youth Success at Education Northwest for the Together We Thrive Luncheon and help us transform outcomes for Oregon youth. Keynote Speakers Cameron Knowles marks his fifth season as an assistant coach for the Timbers in 2016. A former defender for the second-division
United by a common mission to improve the lives of our children and communities in the Northwest, the Institute for Youth Success (formerly known as Oregon Mentors) will merge with Education Northwest effective August 15, 2015. This merger will create a full-service, innovative regional center to
Since this post appeared in March, 2015 as part of our series on collective impact, the Institute for Youth Success has joined Education Northwest to better support youth-serving agencies in Oregon and across the region. Collective impact initiatives have data at the core of their efforts to
The Institute for Youth Success (IYS) has been supporting youth programs since our inception as the Oregon Mentoring Initiative in 2002. Today, as part of Education Northwest, we work with more than 190 youth programs that support kids by building a strong connection to an adult or older peer. For
This blog post comes from 90% by 2020, a broad partnership promoting student success in Anchorage, Alaska, and continues our March series on collective impact—an approach that mobilizes the community to form a long-term and permanent solution to a societal problem. See our news article about 90% by

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