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Washington state continues to face a critical teacher shortage. To address the problem, state policymakers and district administrators are looking at “grow-your-own” teacher strategies, which seek to identify and support current paraeducators and limited certificated teachers who are interested in
Bringing people together Is an investment that pays off—but how do you cover costs to build educator networks?
For districts and schools hit hard by teacher shortages, there's only so much you can do alone in hiring and keeping high-quality teachers. Mike Siebersma writes on how networks can be the answer.
According to Karen Martin, a teacher and instructional coach in Alaska, the Northwest Rural Innovation and Student Engagement (NW RISE) Network builds connections.
With ESSA placing states and districts in the driver’s seat when it comes to school improvement, what lessons can be learned from the School Improvement Grant (SIG) program?
With raising Oregon high school graduation rate a top priority, we asked Deputy Superintendent of Public Instruction Salam Noor a few questions on the direction that the state is taking to make progress in this area.
Laura John writes about how Montana's graduation rates for American Indian students are rising and the state's various programs and initiatives that are helping close the achievement gap in Indian Country.
Networks are a promising strategy for rural teachers to overcome the challenges of isolation. Danette Parsley provides three takeaways from our role in establishing a rural network in the Northwest.
Caitlin Scott writes about the difficulties rural schools might face when replacing principals and a concept she finds promising for engaging rural students.
As our 50th anniversary approaches, Board Chair Barbara Adams writes about how Education Northwest's work reflects its core values of equity and support for evidence-based policy and practice.
As economic forces shift in rural areas, how can creating expanded educational opportunities in science, technology, engineering, and math make a difference for rural students? Guest Blogger Barbara Peterson answers the question in a post based on an article she coauthored in the May 2015 issue of...
Steve Fleischman reflects on how using research and evidence to provide an excellent education for every student was as important 50 years ago as it is today.
Danette Parsley writes about two exceptional schools in rural Oregon that are beating the odds through data use, high-quality instruction, community building, and strong leadership.
This blog post describes how a one-size-fits-all approach to school turnaround may be inappropriate — or even detrimental — to rural schools.
Last year, we unveiled Success Now!—our new approach to school improvement. Unlike other approaches, the Success Now! framework helps schools focus their efforts and see quick gains in student success while working toward long-term goals and sustainable change. The Mary Walker School District in
This brief serves as a resource for K–12 districts, state education agencies, higher education institutions and district Title VI Indian education offices.
This brief outlines steps district and school leaders can take to expand science, technology, engineering and mathematics opportunities for students through school-community partnerships.
Last fall, REL Northwest, joined with REL Central and REL Pacific to organize a convening of tribal representatives from across the country to examine how our education system can incorporate indigenous language and culture and what research can increase and improve those efforts.
One of the major tasks facing Native American communities is to create lifelong learning opportunities that allow all the members to improve their quality of life.
Developed by master American Indian and Alaska Native educators, the inventory is designed to determine how and to what extent your school is supporting the needs of Native students. Nine key school areas that impinge upon students were identified to inventory. Those who administer the inventory

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