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"To paraphrase Author Robert Fulghum, school is where we learn to share, play fair, not hit others, and say you’re sorry when you hurt someone. It is also the place where we learn to clean up our own messes."
Researchers Jason Greenberg Motamedi and Malkeet Singh write about how they used a methodology developed by medical researchers to create a useful tool for determining how long it will take students to pass a language proficiency test and exit English learner services.
Belonging is a fundamental human need. What strategies that educators can use to help students feel more secure in their school experiences?
Networks are a promising strategy for rural teachers to overcome the challenges of isolation. Danette Parsley provides three takeaways from our role in establishing a rural network in the Northwest.
Steve Fleischman responds to a critic's assertion on the status of education research and points to several examples of research consistently and effectively building local capacity of educators in the field.
Dr. Ethel Simon-McWilliams, a strong advocate for children and educational equity, died July 12, 2017. She joined Education Northwest (then known as the Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory) in 1979 and served as the organization’s executive director/chief executive officer from the mid-1990s
Springdale Elementary School in Washington state dedicated itself to school improvement through a series of focused change cycles. Did the school's efforts pay off?
Jacob Williams looks at the role educators can play in supporting youth to help keep them out of trouble and discusses several risk domains associated with young people based on a new, comprehensive literature review.
Alaska's Superintendent of the Year breaks down the three principles that have helped shape his district: attention, building, and collaboration.
Jacqueline Raphael and Rhonda Barton look closely at the demands of the Common Core State Standards on student writing and show how a traits-based model for teaching writing can help educators meet the challenge.
Improve the the way you teach writing for English learners, students with special needs, gifted and talented students and all the students in your classroom.
"We wrestle with these issues of privilege, dominant culture, and expectations in North Clackamas schools. We’ve found that there is a strong interplay among instructional practices, equity, and leadership. At the intersection of these concepts lie five principles that we can follow to have a...
Steve Fleischman writes in praise of the new federal education law for its expansion of the use of evidence to drive school improvement.
Read about how Corbett School District Superintendent Randy Trani wanted the same opportunities for his district’s students as his own kids, and how the district is getting close to reaching its goals of 100 percent...
Oregon's teacher of the year writes about how he came to place students' cultures front and center in his classroom and in the community and encourages more teachers to promote equity.
      Do you know what it takes to build an emotionally and physically safe space for youth? Building an emotionally safe community of peers and adults is essential for youth to learn and develop as individuals. This interactive workshop will introduce participants to a variety of activities
      The Research Institute (TRI), in partnership with the Oregon Department of Education (ODE), is hosting the 21st Century Community Learning Centers (CCLC) 2016 Spring Conference at Western Oregon University on May 5 and 6. The conference theme is "Every Student Thriving, and the
      Leading For Equity (LFE) is an intensive two-day institute for teams working on educational equity efforts. The National Equity Project provides teams with expert, caring guidance and facilitation to collaboratively address the personal and technical challenges they face in their schools,
Oregon Promise, a program that covers most tuition at Oregon community colleges, appears to be having an impact on the college-going decisions of students—particularly first-generation students.
Spanish-speaking students—the largest group of language minority students in Washington state—take fewer advanced courses and earn lower grades in those courses than other language minority students and English-only speakers, regardless of whether they are classified as English learners.

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