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Washington state continues to face a critical teacher shortage. To address the problem, state policymakers and district administrators are looking at “grow-your-own” teacher strategies, which seek to identify and support current paraeducators and limited certificated teachers who are interested in
“The health of my community, and of Indian Country in general, depends on policymakers with personal experience.”
"For me, learning about my own culture is a lifelong process, but I definitely believe we should be telling our own story whenever possible.”
Bringing people together Is an investment that pays off—but how do you cover costs to build educator networks?
Legislation that establishes tribal K-12 schools is a step toward honoring meaningful self-determination policy for Native people. It's also a way to emphasize Native culture and improve student outcomes.
A study found disparities in advanced course enrollment among students from different language groups. What can schools do to increase advanced course enrollment and success for English learners?
West Valley School District students can earn industry certificates in seventh grade and journeyman credentials in high school. What can other districts learn from West Valley's thriving CTE model?
Researchers Jason Greenberg Motamedi and Malkeet Singh write about how they used a methodology developed by medical researchers to create a useful tool for determining how long it will take students to pass a language proficiency test and exit English learner services.
Many areas of the country are facing severe teacher shortages. In February, we took a close look at how education stakeholders in our region are addressing this problem.
How does an eastern Washington high school build and retain an exceptional and diverse teaching staff despite challenges? Pasco High School Principal Raúl Sital shares his approach.
As economic forces shift in rural areas, how can creating expanded educational opportunities in science, technology, engineering, and math make a difference for rural students? Guest Blogger Barbara Peterson answers the question in a post based on an article she coauthored in the May 2015 issue of...
Coming into high school a few years ago, I could not have anticipated how valuable skills like marking up important parts of the text or re-reading certain passages could be to my grasping of the material. As a sophomore last year (and a freshman the year before), I shrugged off most of the advice,
Located on the Spokane Indian Reservation, the Wellpinit middle and high schools serve roughly 150 students in grades 6 through 12. When I started in September as a first-year principal, I was looking for a method to maximize results. I’d taught at Wellpinit for six years and saw that our teachers
As graduation draws near, Education Northwest would like to honor a group of exemplary students and future leaders from Pasco High School in Washington who met with us last year during a site visit. A minority-majority school, Pasco High promotes bilingual and biliterate education. Their culture is
Last year, we unveiled Success Now!—our new approach to school improvement. Unlike other approaches, the Success Now! framework helps schools focus their efforts and see quick gains in student success while working toward long-term goals and sustainable change. The Mary Walker School District in
The authors wrote this post on behalf of the Association of Educational Service Districts Network (AESD Network). In Washington state and around the country, educational service agencies—or ESDs, as they are known in our state—play an important role in delivering professional development, financial
This brief shares key findings from a case study of how Highline Public Schools and its community partners have contributed to the Road Map Project.
Looking at the assets (rather than the deficits) of English learners is a way of reframing the conversation.
English learners entering high school have to learn both English and grade-level content to begin accumulating credits to graduate. Unfortunately, in many cases, English language development courses do not provide the necessary credits. So how are students supposed to graduate if their required
Is there a recipe for a “super teacher” when it comes to helping English language learner (ELL) students develop academic English skills? That question is important throughout the nation, as the proportion of ELL students has climbed by almost 64 percent from 1994–95 to 2009–10. During the same 15

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